IMAT5210 e-Commerce Software

This summative coursework will be marked anonymously No (marked during viva)
The learning outcomes that are assessed by this coursework are:
1. Illustrate the design of eCommerce web application.
2. Construct an e-commerce application the demonstrates the interaction between a range of
software components, such as HTML5, JavaScript, web services, and database.
3. Demonstrate the connection between e-commerce software design and development.
This coursework is: Individual
This coursework constitutes 100% to the overall module mark.
Date Set: 8 March 2022 at 00:01
Date & Time Due: 13 May 2022 at 12:00 noon
Your marked coursework and feedback will be available to you on:
If for any reason this is not forthcoming by the due date your module leader
will let you know why and when it can be expected. The Head of Studies
(CEMstudentexperience@dmu.ac.uk) should be informed of any
issues relating to the return of marked coursework and feedback.
Note that you should normally receive feedback on your coursework by no
later than four working weeks after the formal hand-in date, provided that
you met the submission deadline.
Within 20 working
days of the
deadline,
arranged through
vivas.
When completed you are required to submit your coursework to:
• Blackboard VLE through an assignment submission portal as a .zip file. (see attached document)
Late submission of coursework policy: Late submissions will be processed in accordance with
current University regulations which state:
“the time period during which a student may submit a piece of work late without authorisation and
have the work capped at 40% [50% at PG level] if passed is 14 calendar days. Work submitted
unauthorised more than 14 calendar days after the original submission date will receive a mark of
0%. These regulations apply to a student’s first attempt at coursework. Work submitted late
without authorisation which constitutes reassessment of a previously failed piece of coursework
will always receive a mark of 0%.”
Academic Offences and Bad Academic Practices: These include plagiarism, cheating, collusion,
copying work and reuse of your own work, poor referencing or the passing off of somebody
else’s ideas as your own. If you are in any doubt about what constitutes an academic offence or
bad academic practice you must check with your tutor. Further information and details of how
DSU can support you, if needed, is available at: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/thestudent-gateway/academic-support-office/academic-offences.aspx and
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-support-office/badacademic-practice.aspx
Tasks to be undertaken:
eCommerce platforms are usually web-enabled software that allows stakeholders such as
businesses and consumers to exchange information and provide services that could result
in buying and/or selling. Interactions among stakeholders could take the following
dimensions:
S/No Types of eCommerce Example
1 Business to Business
(B2B)
Communication between amazon and FedEx
regarding sales delivery. Usually internal to the
business involved
2 Business to Consumer
(B2C)
AirBnB.com
3 Consumer to Business to
(C2B)
Amazon.com
4 Consumer to Consumer
(C2C)
Gumtree.com
Sub-task 1: As an e-commerce software designer and developer, you have been asked to
suggest an e-commerce software that could facilitate interaction between two or more
stakeholders mentioned in table 1 (i.e. business and consumers). The interaction is
expected to drive business or service interaction.
1. What e-commerce web application would you suggest? How will the web
application work?
2. Highlight at least four functional requirements of the e-commerce web application.
Sub-task 2: Develop a 6-slide PowerPoint document that summarises the design of your
proposed e-commerce software as follows:
1. A title page that contains your P-number and the name of the e-Commerce web
application design
2. An Introduction that describes the e-commerce application, the purpose it will
serve, its users, and technologies that will be used for creating the web application
3. A use-case diagram that describes how users interact with the e-commerce web
application.
4. Entity Relationship Diagram(s) that suggests how the database tables interact.
5. The class diagram that reflects the association between the classes/objects of the
e-commerce platform
6. Swimlane diagram that shows the stepwise user/system actions and how the
actions unfold.
Submit the PowerPoint file to Turnitin.
Task B:
Using Microsoft Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment (IDE), C#
programming language, and SQL server database, develop a working artifact of your
design in Task A. Please pay attention to the following:
1. Ensure the web application demonstrate n-tier architecture.
2. Show clear interaction with database and reflect efficient database
design/structure. An example of interaction is data insert or update events.
3. Reflect attributes of excellent coding technique, the program comes should be
readable, efficient, extendable, unit-testable, and consistent.
4. The artifact should be adaptable to a real-world situation.
5. Show best practices such as error handling, user input validation, responsiveness
using CSS/ JavaScript, and encryption of sensitive data.
6. The program code should compile and run without syntax errors.
First, create 2 minutes video that demonstrates the e-commerce software you developed.
Secondly, zip the solution folder into a file. Finally, Submit the video file and zipped folder
to Turnitin.
Deliverables to be submitted for assessment:
Students will be required to submit the following for assessment:
1. PowerPoint Slide (design)
2. Zipped Source Code (development)
3. 2-3 minutes Video presentation (development)
How the work will be marked: See the appendix
Module leader/tutor name: Dr. Adebowale Owoseni
Contact details: Adebowale.Owoseni@dmu.ac.uk
IMAT5210 Marking Sheet (e-Commerce Software)
eCommerce Application Design (30%)
Mark Grid/Weight 0-39% 40-49% 50-59% 60-69% 70-79% 80-89% >90%
System description and
requirements (10)
Presents
insufficient
for
understanding
the system
design
Description
and illustration
are sufficient
to understand
the system.
There are
alignments
between the
description
and the
diagrams
The diagrams
have
significant
missing parts.
Portrays a
clear
description of
the system.
There are
clear
alignments
between the
description
and the
diagrams
The diagrams
have some
missing parts
Fully describe
the system.
There are very
understandable
alignments
between the
description and
the diagrams
The diagrams
very few
missing parts
Succinctly describe
the system with
examples
There are very
understandable
alignments
between the
description and the
diagrams
The diagrams were
neatly developed
with very few
missing parts
Explain the
system in a
a way that is fully
sufficient with
examples
There are fully
understandable
alignments
between the
description and
the diagrams
The diagrams
were neatly
developed with
no missing part
Clearly describe
the system in a
skilled
manner with
examples
There are very
understandable
alignments
between the
description and the
diagrams
The diagrams were
neatly developed
with no missing
part
Development of use-case
diagram (5)
Development of Entity
Relationship Diagram (5)
Development of Sequence
or Swimlane diagram (5)
Development of class
diagram (5)
eCommerce Application Development (70%)
Mark Grid/Weight 0-39% 40-49% 50-59% 60-69% 70-79% 80-89% >90%
Demonstrate N-tier
Architecture
(15)
No layered
design and
arrangement
of program
files and
folders
Layered design
and
arrangement
of program
files and
folders, but
not rational
Layered
design and
arrangement
of program
files and
folders, in a
rational way
Some
components
are still
merged
Layered design
and
arrangement of
program files
and folders, in
a rational way.
Most
components
are separated
Shows some
interaction
Layered design and
arrangement of
program files and
folders, in a
rational way.
All components are
separated
Shows clear
interaction
Layered design
and arrangement
of program files
and folders, in a
rational way.
All components
are separated
Demonstrates
creativity in the
usage of the
Layered design and
arrangement of
program files and
folders, in a
rational way.
All components are
separated
Naming
conventions of
between
layered
components
between layered
components
layered
components
components are
very descriptive
Demonstrates
creativity in the
usage of the
layered
components
Show interaction with
database and reflect
efficient database design/
structure
(15)
No database The database
exists but no
evidence of
connections
with the
software.
There is a
database
connection,
but the data
command
does not work
There is a
database
connection
with failing
data
commands
(insert/
update/ delete)
The database
tables have no
primary keys.
There is a database
connection, with
consistent data
commands
(insert/ update/
delete)
The database
tables have primary
keys.
There is a
database
connection, with
consistent data
commands
(insert/ update/
delete)
The database is
normalized, and
they have primary
keys.
There is a database
connection, with
consistent data
commands
(insert/ update/
delete)
The database is
normalized, and
they have primary
keys.
Secure sensitive
data on the
database by
hashing/encryption
Reflect attributes of a
good code: Readable,
efficient, extendable
Unit testable, consistent
(10)
Codes are not
readable and
consistent
Presents
readable codes
to the extent
that requires
significant
effort to make
sense of the
codes but not
extendable
and re-usable
Readable
codes, that
make sense
with little
effort.
Methods can
be extended
and re-used
Readable codes
with clear and
consistent
naming
conventions.
Methods,
classes, and
objects are
reusable
Readable codes
with clear and
consistent naming
conventions.
Methods, classes,
and objects are
reusable
Include comments
that attempt to
explain the code
Readable codes
with clear and
consistent
naming
conventions.
Methods, classes,
and objects are
reusable
Include
comments that
reasonably
explains the code
Readable codes
with clear and
consistent naming
conventions.
Methods, classes,
and objects are
reusable. Also,
depict objectoriented
programming
technique
Include very clear
comments that
explain the code
Adaptable to a real-world
situation. Can the solution
be used as-is in a real
situation?
(10)
The solution
has no realworld
significance
Solution barely
resonate with
a real-world
situation
Solution
reasonably
shows realworld
application
but will
require
significant
effort to adapt
to a real-life
problem
The solution
reveals realworld
application
could be
adapted with
some
improvements
Most requirements
reflect real-world
application. They
could be adapted
with significant
enhancement
Most
requirements
reflect real –
worlds situation
and could be
adapted with
little
enhancement
All requirements
simulate the realworld situation and
could be deployed
for use in a real
situation
Show best practices such
as error handling, user
input validation,
responsiveness using CSS/
JavaScript
(10)
Program
codes have no
trait of coding
best practice
Demonstrates
some best
practices
Some best
practices that
are
inconsistent
across the
application
Some best
practices that
are consistent
across the
application
Program codes
reflect best
practices that
consistent across
the application and
enhance the
usability
Program codes
creatively reflect
best practices
that are
consistent across
the application
and enhance the
user interaction
Program codes
creatively reflect
best practices that
are consistent
across the
application and
enhance the
system
performance and
user interaction
Pre-recoded screencast No screencast
provided
The video is
blurred and
not audible
The video is
not blurred
and audible,
but has
uncoordinated
narrative,
difficult to
understand
Video shows
basic flow of
web site. No
reference is
made to input
validation,
error handling,
themes, and
web security
Good video that
describes the
important features
of the website, and
references made to
important
elements such as
input validation,
error handling,
themes, and web
security
Very good video.
that describes the
expected features
of the website,
and references
made to all
important
elements such as
input validation,
error handling,
themes, and web
security
Excellent and
creative narration
of the web
application and its
features.
Describes the
expected features
of the website, and
references made
to all important
elements such as
input validation,
error handling, CSS
themes, and web
securi

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